bait casting

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Tight Lines Tuesday Mount Everest

Tight Lines Tuesday Mount Everest

Tight Lines Tuesday Mount Everest by John Etchieson –

In the early 1920s (1921 – 1924) several expeditions were undertaken by different parties of men to ascend to the top of Mount Everest, the worlds tallest mountain at 29,035 feet above sea level which is located midway between Tibet and China in the Himalayas. Mount Everest had been named by the Royal Geographical Society in 1865 to honor Colonel Sir George Everest (pictured) who was responsible for the surveying of India from 1830 through 1843. The world wide attendant publicity and media news coverage (including a silent film documentary by the Royal Geographical Society distributed to theaters world wide) of the several attempted but unsuccessful ascensions to the top of Mount Everest by George Mallory (3 times), Andrew Irvine, and others made the name of Mount Everest a house hold name and part of the contemporary popular culture 90+ years ago in 1924.

The G. H. Mansfield Company wasted no time in obtaining a trade mark for the name Mount Everest together with an image of that historic landmark in 1924 which it used to associate its highest quality braided silk fishing line with the highest and most recognizable mountain in the world over the course of the next 9 years prior to Mansfield filing bankruptcy and closing in 1933. From those 9 years of Mansfield’s production of their Mount Everest fishing Line, less that a dozen examples are […]

2017-09-19T09:46:15+00:00 September 19th, 2017|Comments Off on Tight Lines Tuesday Mount Everest

Heddon Waltonian No31 AB Reel

Heddon Waltonian No31 AB Reel

The Heddon Waltonian No31 AB Reel was first introduced around 1927. Made in Dowagiac Michigan by James Heddons Sons, the Heddon NO.31 AB “WALTONIAN” Casting reel was produced. The level wind reel themselves made are of lightweight aluminum. The casting reels were first introduced by James Heddon’s Sons in their 1927 catalog and would only sell for a couple years. These were actually Trade reels produced for Heddon by the Meisselbach-Catucci Mfg. Co. of Newark, N.J. and were identical to their No.1000 “Superlite” models.

Heddon Waltonian No31 AB Photo Gallery

 

 

2017-08-07T08:03:07+00:00 July 31st, 2017|Comments Off on Heddon Waltonian No31 AB Reel

Heddon Dowagiac Underwater Lure 1902 Ad


Heddon Dowagiac Underwater Lure 1902 Ad

This Heddon Dowagiac Underwater Lure 1902 Ad is one of the earliest lure articles and ads I’ve seen or have run across for Heddon and their antique fishing lures. You just wont find many items in 1902, the same year the Dowagiac Underwater Casting lure and the Dowagiac Expert lures were said to have been made.

Heddon Dowagiac Underwater Lure 1902 Ad

“Dowagiac” Casting Baits

    James Heddon & Sons, Dowagiac Michigan are placing on the market “Dowagiac” Casting Baits, Illustrated. These baits are all hand made.

    The “Dowagiac Expert” bait is made for surface casting for bass etc., and is largely used in warmer waters in the southern parts of the Northern States, and also in the South, The “Dowagiac Underwater” bait is intended for use in deep waters and where the temperature is lower in shallow waters, as will be found in the Northerly parts of states bordering Canada and the lakes. All the baits which are of wood are finished with three preparatory coats and then with three coats of hard enamel which will not crack or rub off and then necessitate frequent painting. The surface is a glistening white that creates a reflection of light which makes it attractive and enables fish to see it a long distance. The sockets or inserts into which the hooks are fastened keep them always outward and presented to the fish. All hooks are […]

2017-04-13T13:27:04+00:00 April 13th, 2017|Comments Off on Heddon Dowagiac Underwater Lure 1902 Ad

Ball Minnow Trap

Ball Minnow Trap

The Ball Minnow Trap is really a great piece of angling history. Let me first add by saying yes, this is the same maker as the famous Ball jar line.

For those that may not know here is a piece borrowed from the Society of Historical Archaeology Inc. Although its roots go back to the 1880 making wooden covered milk cans and then to glass inserts for metal cans that wasn’t the era of the minnow trap production.

 

“Ball Brothers Co., Inc. (1922-1987)
Between 1913 and 1929, Ball acquired four more of its competitors and reorganized
again on December 19, 1922, as the Ball Brothers Co., Inc. The firm replaced the now-outdated
Owens machines with Ball-Bingham, Miller JPM, and English Moorshead machines in the
1930s. The firm purchased the Three Rivers Glass Co. in 1936 and closed it down after filling
existing orders, a fate visited on many of the earlier acquisitions (Roller 1983:456-457;
2011:659; Smith 1989; 1996).
The Owens license expired in 1933, so Ball began negotiations with Hartford-Empire and
acquired a license for those machines on March 25. On January 8, 1935, Ball executive Fred
Petty announced that Ball would begin production of packers’ ware in response to a major
decline in fruit jar sales over the past three years (Birmingham 1980:115). Ball (1937:96)
illustrated a birds-eye view drawing of the Muncie plant in 1936 (Figure 4).
By 1937, the Ball Brothers made “fruit jars, […]

2017-04-11T12:20:18+00:00 April 11th, 2017|Comments Off on Ball Minnow Trap